Tag Archives: inspiration

It’s 2015 so Ditch the Old…Responsibly!

With the New Year upon us so are thoughts of starting fresh. Starting over. Not making the same mistakes. medium_395505861

Organizing supplies go on sale so we can reorganize cluttered spaces with the intention of getting our lives in order.

We’ve likely received holiday gifts that need to find homes amongst the other stuff in our overstuffed homes.

So just like the old year, it’s out with old and in with the new to make room for the possibilitiesthose wonderous, marvelous possibilities! 

To do so responsibly, I share a link to one of my favourite organizations, The David Suzuki Foundation. Here they share where to recycle or repurpose your discarded items to lighten your load in your home and your load on our planet.

My sincerest wishes to each of you that this New Year will bring you all you’ve imagined and envisioned and that you have the courage to make it happen.

Share below your favourite places to donate or recycle your well-loved items or
Share one of the possibilities you’re intending to bring to fruition in 2015. 

Love and Hugs.

photo credit: Claire
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Quotes That Make You Go Hmmm…

“It’s not what you say out of your mouth that determines your life,
it’s what you whisper to yourself
that has the most power!

― Robert T. Kiyosaki

____________

Hi Friends,
I wanted to be sure you all heard the news. Carol Tice is opening up the Freelance Writer’s Den TOMORROW, Thursday December 18th, to people on her wait-list ONLY! The Den will be open for a short time then will lock again until March 2015. If you’ve been whispering to yourself about becoming a freelance writer, then you owe it to yourself to hop on over there and check it out. I have a link on the right and have more info on my Sharing The Love page but bottom-line, you have to be on the waiting list to get the invitation to join.
Thought you may want to know asap.
Love and hugs. ♥

Once Upon A… Stop! Listen to this First.

Stories we read as children stay with us as we grow and they shape how we see the world.  And that can be a problem.

In today’s Bright-Side-of-the-Web, I bring you novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s TED Talk entitled: The Danger of a Single Story.

A beautiful story-teller herself, Chimamanda eloquently relates her life experiences related to her encounters with the single story.

Enjoy:

 

If you enjoyed this TED Talk, below is a link to four more inspiring talks about the importance of educating girls.
Don’t you just LOVE TED!

Let’s expand our stories! 4 more TED links here: http://www.ted.com/playlists/193/the_importance_of_educating_gi

 

 

 

 

2 Quick Ways to Help Pave the Path from Poverty

For the last ten years or so, my extended family gathers for Christmas dinner but medium_12684133474instead of giving each other gifts, – we really don’t need anything – we all put whatever amount of money we feel we can afford to donate into a hat – money that would have gone toward store-bought gifts. Then each person puts in one suggestion of a charity that they would like to support. One suggestion gets drawn and the pot of money gets allocated to that charity with the suggester receiving the tax receipt.

My kids, age 6 & 9 when we began, even did extra chores throughout December so they could have money to contribute too. They were happy to pass up gifts from aunts, uncles and grandparents in order to give to a worthy cause (after all, they still got gifts from Santa).

The tradition of giving is not new at this time of year. Whether you think of giving as  a feel-good practice, a feeling of obligation, or maybe simply as a tax break before the year-end, the choices of places to donate are endless and varied.

That, my friends, is why I am so excited to share these two companies I’ve come across that I feel break the mould of traditional donation locations. (I get absolutely zero kick-back, I pinky swear!)

If you’re an entrepreneur, or know one, you know how hard it is to get a business off the ground.

Now add to that third-world conditions, very little money or food, and just struggling to survive from day-to-day.

What if there was a way that these people could help themselves get out of that situation using the skills they have and the knowledge of what they need based on their daily lives and traditions.

Well, the companies I’m about to reveal assist in entrepreneurial endeavours in medium_10833890384third-world countries, empowering citizens to create businesses that change the lives of thousands of their fellow countrymen and women.

Given a leg-up, these people are able to stand on their own and grow profitable businesses.  Money invested, once re-paid – and it is repaid – gets reinvested toward other entrepreneurs. A real pay-it-forward practice.

But don’t take my word for it, check out the websites for yourself and read about the hundreds of people, families and communities that are being helped to help themselves.

Being an entrepreneur myself, I know how much time and effort it takes to get a business off the ground and keep it rolling. I can’t imagine even attempting it, let alone thinking about it if faced with the challenges of poverty.

Wouldn’t a donation in the name of an entrepreneur you know – who really doesn’t need another reindeer sweater – make an excellent holiday gift(I can hear them thanking me now!)  You’d be saying, “Your entrepreneurial spirit has inspired me to give someone less fortunate the chance to succeed, just as you have.”

I can tell you from first-hand experience that it feels great to know my money is helping kick-start a chain reaction of good.

Please take a look and decide for yourself. 

Kiva
http://www.kiva.org/

The Acumen Fund
http://acumen.org/

Let’s start a chain of sharing. What’s your favourite place to donate to? Please share below. 

photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/miguelvirkkunen/12684133474/
photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/vinothchandar/10833890384/

How Two Choice Words Can Change Your Perspective

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns,
or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses.”
― Abraham Lincoln

medium_468886018How we look at things is certainly governed by our past experiences,
but you can choose your attitude toward the outcome.

Learn from mistakes or be consumed by them.

Forgive misgivings or harbor resentments.

Look on the bright-side or seek the worst.

Words are funny little things too.

Words can evoke an emotion or project an attitude.

That’s why words can hurt and emails can be misconstrued.

As I pondered my choices of attitude and words, I felt the name of this blog didn’t really convey my feelings accurately any more.

Why did I feel I was struggling to stay positive?

Because I was pushing against the negative.

We struggle when there’s a fight. When we feel we aren’t being heard.

What happens if we stop struggling?

The resistance is no longer there.

We surrender to what is out of our control.

I can only choose how I look at things, how I react, how I feel.

And I’ve realized one thing for sure –

Positivity is a choice.

So rather than Wrestle and Struggle, I will Embrace and Choose.

Welcome to the next generation of my blog!

Embracing Pollyanna
Choosing To Stay Positive in a World of Negativity.
 

It may seem like a small change. A tweak in language. A waste of time even.
But to me it is a shift in attitude, in perspective, in feeling.

You may wonder why I have chosen, yes chosen, to keep ‘world of negativity’ if I am so geared toward the feeling of positivity. That is because I feel we are so bombarded by negative media and messages.

And although I have no control over that, what I do have control over is what I choose to subject myself to and what I choose to put out into this world.

What can you expect?

I will continue to post about

  • the positivity I see in the world
  • thought-provoking talks
  • heart-warming messages
  • my thoughts as I move throughout my small world and the great beyond

What you will see more of, however, are stories about:

  • our environment
  • those who are working hard for the benefit of others.

I admit that these stories may not always, in fact may not often, portray a positive situation but they will be stories that I feel not enough people are aware of.

They are realities of our world that we must face and do something about sooner than later.

I’m hoping that by learning about them, you will feel empowered to effect change.

Once aware of a problem, we can make educated choices thereby achieving  (hopefully) a positive result.

Awareness = Education.
Education = Informed Choices
Informed Choices = Empowerment
Empowerment = Positive Change

That is my hope.
That is my intention.

I want this to be a place where you can come to feel uplifted, inspired, educated and driven to make a positive difference in the world.

Where you too can Embrace and Choose.

So rejoice, because thorn bushes are chock-full of fragrant roses.

Are you with me?

If you find my blog by URL, both http://www.embracingpollyanna.com and http://www.wrestlingpollyanna.com should – fingers crossed – get you to the same place. 😉
photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/smb_flickr/468886018/

 

5 Life Lessons You Can Learn from Looking Backward

A year ago this time, I was in a very different place.medium_407591133

I was secondary caregiver to my mother whose Alzheimer’s disease was progressing more rapidly than any of us had expected, and certainly had hoped.

I was primary relief for my father who was shouldering the brunt of the daily exhaustion, frustration and heart-ache of living with a loved-one with Alzheimer’s.

I was living in the suburbs, trying to maintain an aging house and yard.

I was working hard to grow my business while also working part-time in a career path I had no interest in, but it paid some bills.

And I was trying to balance my own family life and all that entails on a daily basis.

I was stressed, I was tired – ok, exhausted.

Mostly I felt alone. My mom, the one I knew at least, my compass, my champion, my sounding board, my support, my friend had left me.

Flash-forward one year and all that has changed.

My mother seems content and is physically healthy in a nursing home surrounded by angels who attend to her daily and nightly needs; the stress and constant worry lifted from our weary shoulders.

Don’t get me wrong – we still worry – but we know she is safe and well cared-for. And what more can we ask for her, knowing that we could not provide the same level of care ourselves.

I  have moved to the city and down-sized to an apartment. I don’t miss my house or my excess possessions. In fact, I am still donating things weekly, anxious to pare down to just the essentials (and a wee bit more – it is nice to have a few luxuries, but only if I have space to store them!)

I am walking to shops instead of driving everywhere.

I am living close to theatres and our world-renowned symphony and film festival planning evenings out instead of in being numbed by the television.

And I am gearing my business toward a path that I know will be fulfilling.

So here are the 5 lessons I’ve learned over this past year that you can use too:

1. Ask For Help.
Try as we might, we could not provide for my mother as we wanted to and especially as she needed. We called on in-home care until that option was exhausted. When the phone rang and my dad asked me to come over to help him, I ran, because I knew if he was asking, he was reaching a breaking point. (Asking for help is not something that comes easily in our family.)

medium_2234720298But if we hadn’t asked for help, we may not have received it, and who knows where we’d be today.

Maybe my mom would still be in a nursing home, but not with the timing she and we required and I shudder to think of the many scenarios that could have unfolded if we had soldiered on, trying to manage by ourselves.

2. Accept Help.
Sounds obvious that if you ‘ask for help’ you naturally ‘accept help’, but they really are two separate things.

As hard as asking for help is – and if you are not used to asking, believe me, it is hard, very hard – sometimes accepting help is equally or more difficult, especially when it is offered unsolicited.

Often our friends, family and colleagues recognize well before we do that we are struggling and could use a hand.

When help is offered, step back and pause and try to stifle your pride.

Ignore the “I can do it”, “I’m fine” “I’m managing” voice that so many of us listen to.

medium_3445776069Take a deep breath, recognize the gift you are being offered and say, “Thank you so much for caring. Yes, I really could use your help”.

Even if you only allow them to do something small or easy, it is one less thing for you to worry about.  Then accepting help the next time it’s offered may be just a tiny bit easier for you. 

3. Surrender
There are some things that are simply out of our control. So surrender to them instead of fighting against them, wishing and hoping that things were different.

Accept that this is the way it is.

We could not stop, halt or reverse my mother’s disease progression no matter how much we wished we could. We had to surrender ourselves to the facts and do what was best for her, taking ourselves out of the equation.

We can only control our own actions so we acted in her best interests.

Surrender can bring grief. Let yourself grieve. You’ve been fighting the no-win battle.

Surrender. Release. Breathe. Accept. And move on from this new place.

It is from this place that I realize my sisters and I are providing the same for my mother that she for so many years provided for us. We are now her compass, her champion, her advocate, her support, her friends – and we’re good at it since we had the best teacher.

4. Look forward
Funny  that ‘looking forward’ appears on a list of lessons learned by looking backward, but I learned that by looking forward and envisioning a different possibility for myself, my life is now following a new trajectory – one that feels supportive and right for me. 

image012If all we did was look backward, we’d only see where we’ve been and have no idea what possibilities await. Some might call that ‘living on the edge’ or ‘living spontaneously’. I don’t.

Living life through the rear-view mirror harbors regrets.

You look at opportunities passed-by. Forks in the road you could have traversed. I don’t want to live with regrets.

Looking forward allows for planning and intention. For me, those are two crucial components in achieving my goals.

And I know that the future means I will have to say goodbye to my mother once again. (I think having to say goodbye twice is the hardest part for the family of Alzheimer’s sufferers.) But until then, she is still a part of our lives and we love her just as much. Passing on is a fact of life for us all. I shall be grateful for the time we’ve had but continue to look forward to other happiness ahead – she would want that.

5. See how far you’ve come.
Contradictory to #4, looking backward can be extremely helpful IF you don’t live there. 

Periodically turn around and see where you were six months ago, or a year ago, of five years ago.

medium_1431384410Examine the lessons you’ve learned.

Celebrate your achievements.

Recognize your champions – even drop them a card of thanks.

Be grateful for the help you accepted along the way.

Then turn around and set your course for the future.

Yes, a lot has changed for me over the past year but what has remained consistent is my positive outlook.

I have realized that positivity isn’t a character trait.

Positivity is a choice.

I choose to look on the bright-side.
I choose to find the good in people.
I choose to look forward more than back.

And when I do look back, I look for the lessons I’ve learned and the distance I’ve travelled.

Change brings momentum.

Training wheels off, I'm goin' all out!

Training wheels off, I’m goin’ all out!

That is why I’m excited to announce that in the next day or two (technical challenges considered), the name of this blog will be changing.

I hope you come back to see where I’m taking it.

Because with you, the journey is much more fun.

Hop on!

Enjoy the ride!
Let’s see where we end up!

What lessons have you learned over the past year?
Share them below.

Photo credits: Photopin
calendar photo:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/eliazar/407591133/
dog photo:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/themacinator/3445776069/
hands:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/kwerfeldein/2234720298/
white flags:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/alexnako/624779750/
boat wake: Alberto Mateo, The Last Footprint e: 
info@albertomateo.com w: www.albertomateo.com – www.thelastfootprint.com
boy with magnifying glass:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/1431384410/
bike rider: my dad – thankfully no photo of me crashing into a parked car moments later. He didn’t tell me how to stop! That was the next lesson. 😉

10 Life Lessons from a Couch Olympian

I love watching the Olympics, like everyone else.medium_4379618393

The few individuals in the world who have devoted their lives to the pursuit of athletic perfection in their chosen field is an inspiration.

You rally behind them – rooting for your country’s representative to do their best, even if this is the first time you’ve ever heard their name.

You hold your breath during their performance, gasping if they fall.

But what does it take to become an Olympian?

Personally, I haven’t a clue – my favourite sport is channel surfing.

But for 16 days every two years, I am taken back to my childhood when I imagined I could be Nadia Comaneci.  (Btw, did you see her during the 2014 Sochi games? I would still like to be her!!)

One of the Canadian women athletes (and I am ashamed to say that I can’t recall which one – if you know, please post it below) said something that I thought really summed up what sets Olympians apart from the rest of us mere mortals.

She said, (and I am paraphrasing),
“The Olympics aren’t something you can dream about coming to.  You have to believe you will get here.”

It’s been almost a week since I heard that, and it has stayed with me.  Not because I believe that one day I will get to the Olympics, especially if I put zero effort into training for …well, anything.

But I resonated with that statement because it could be applied to each of us, in whatever our life’s pursuit.

For me, my career goal is to tell the stories of people and businesses who are making a difference in the world so they can gain the recognition and support they need to continue their great work.

I could go about making up ad campaigns and marketing strategies to attract companies to my website.  I could cold-call prospects.  I could network and schmooze my patootie off, but if I don’t BELIEVE that I can do this work, I will never reach the ‘Olympic’ level I’ve dreamt about.

Why? Because something in me – in the way I speak, in how I present myself to clients – will convey that I don’t believe in myself – so why should they?

Of course I can’t just cross my fingers, close my eyes, click my heels and say ‘I believe, I believe’ – even if I feel that belief in my soul.

The belief has to be accompanied by action.

There is work to be done to attract the clients, just as the athletes need to train vigorously for hours on end.

I will compete against others vying for the same clients.  And I will win some and I will lose some.  That’s part of the game.

I have heard that athletes that win a silver medal are often depressed becausemedium_2723280142 they were so close to the gold; that bronze medal winners are thrilled because they made it onto the podium; and that fourth place winners are driven to train even harder and often return to win a medal themselves at the next Olympics.

The psychology of competition is complex and interesting.

Often our biggest competition is against ourselves.

We question our very value and self-worth.

Can I do this?
Will anyone find me in the vast webosphere?
What can I offer that is different from the next person?

While I won’t be presented with ribbons or medals for each of my wins, I will consciously acknowledge and celebrate each victory, no matter how small, because with each step I am learning what it takes to be champ.

Here’s what I believe:
To have a chance at winning, no matter the race, you have to:

1. Find what you love to do.
2. Learn all you can.
3. Practice every possible moment.
4. Set firm and realistic goals.
5. Set your intention.
6. Believe you can do it, no matter what others may say.
7. Do it – as many times as it takes, over and over again.
8. Surround yourself with coaches and cheerleaders.
9. Celebrate each and every milestone.
10. Never stop believing.

And every now and again, look back at the starting line and see how far you’ve come.  

Because every victory along your journey is a gold medal win.

Share your latest victory below.  
(Tooting your own horn is like playing your personal anthem.)

Photo credits:
Couch Olympian: photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/sonnetofthemoon/4379618393/”>sonnetofthemoon</a&gt; via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/”>cc</a&gt;
Doggie winners: photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/geckoam/2723280142/”>geckoam</a&gt; via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/”>cc</a&gt;